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Time for Redressing the miscarriage of Justic-French Queen, Marie Antoinette


By CatherineYen(20,979) CatherineYen



Redressing the Miscarriage of Justice -French Queen, Marie Antoinette



Marie Antoinette
 was born November 2, 1755 in Vienna, Austria. She was the youngest and most beautiful daughter of
Francis Stephen I and Maria Theresa, Emperor and Empress of the Holy Roman Empire. Marie Antoinette was brought up believing her destiny was to become queen of . She married the crown prince of France in 1770. Four years later she became queen when her husband was crowned King Louis XVI (House of ).

The stories of Antoinette's excesses are vastly overstated. In fact, rather than ignoring France's growing financial crisis, she reduced the royal household staff, eliminating many unnecessary positions that were based solely on privilege. In the process she offended the nobles, adding their condemnation to the scandalous stories spread by royal hopefuls. It was the nobility that balked at the financial reforms the government ministers tried to make, not the King and Queen, who were in favor of change. In truth, Antoinette and Louis were placed in harms' way not only by elements of their
, but by the changing face of political and social ideology in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1789 a mob descended on the palace at
Versailles and demanded the royal family move to the Tuilerie palace inside Paris. From that point on the King and Queen were virtual prisoners. Antoinette sought aid from other European rulers including her brother, the Austrian Emperor, and her sister, Queen of Naples. After a failed attempt to flee Paris in 1791 Antoinette continued to seek aid from abroad. When and Prussia declared war on France, she was accused of passing military secrets to the enemy. On August 10, 1792 the royal family was arrested on suspicion of treason and imprisoned. On January 21, 1793 King Louis XVI was convicted and executed on the guillotine.

Antoinette was cruely treated during her final days of captivity. Her children were taken from her, and her best friend, the Princess de Lambelle, was killed and her severed head was put on a pike and paraded in front of the Queen. Antoinette followed her husband to the guillotine on October 16, 1793. She was executed without proof of the crimes for which she was accused. She was only 37 years old.

The Bourbon monarchy was restored in 1814 after the fall of
. The succession went to the closest living relative of Louis XVI who became Louis XVIII (Louis XVI son, Louis XVII died in captivity after the revolution). He had escaped to Britain where he sat out the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. The new monarchy had a bumpy road, lasting until 1848 and the ascension of Napoleon III. After III abdicated in 1871, France became a republic.

The data excerpted from:

http://www.lucidcafe.com/lucidcage/library/95nov/antoinette.html

 
My daughter, Tiffy found a beautiful web site denotes  the pink rose is  the symbol of M. Antoinette and the queen composed music too. When you click "music" at the left column of the following web site, you will find the music: C'est mon ami.  Thanks for Tiffy's effort and assistance.

http://www.ladyreading.net/marieantoinette/index-en.html
 

************************************************************************************************************************************

Edmund Burke (1729-1797) was born in Dublin, Ireland, and was elected to the British Parliament. He gave many great speeches which have become classics. The French Revolution of 1789 brought a violent end to the French monarchy and resulted in a reign of terror that included the systematic murder of persons of royal ancestry, including the beheading of the Queen of France, Marie Antoinette, in October, 1793. Burke became an outspoken critic of the excesses of the French Revolution and in this brief speech laments the death of the Queen and the passing of an era.

 

"It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she had just begun to move in, glittering like the morning star full of life and splendor and joy. 0h, what a revolution! and what a heart must I have, to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall! Little did I dream, when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her, in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honor, and of cavaliers! I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards, to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult.

But the age of chivalry is gone; that of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded, and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever. Never, never more, shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom! The unbought grace of life, the cheap defense of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise is gone. It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that chastity of honor, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness. "

Edmund Burke - 1793

 
 



This Blog Post has been read 348 times.
Posted to ProBlogs.com on Monday, January 01, 2007
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